SCAR Gazetteer Information: Each place can have one or more entries in the SCAR Composite Gazetteer, dependant on its origin. By viewing an individual entry, you may see multiple references to the same place. SCAR uses a more general feature type coding, so each place will, in general, have multiple feature types.

Showing all 4 place names.

Name Latitude Longitude Feature Type
Antarctica (GBR) 90° 00' 00.0" S 0° 00' 00.0" E
Name ID: 107534 Place ID: 421

Continental block lying almost entirely S of the Antarctic Circle and including the offshore islands within the margin of the continental shelf, but excluding South Orkney Islands, South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands. Name was first advocated in 1886 by GBR (USA gaz. 1956; APC, 1981). In December 1959 Article VI of the Antarctic Treaty applied the provisions of the Treaty to the area S of lat.60°S The Treaty refers frequently to Antarctica but does not define the name The Australian Antarctica Act, 1960; the New Zealand Antarctic Treaty Act, 1960; and the United Kingdom Antarctic Treaty Order in Council, 1961, define Antarctica, for the purposes of the Acts and the Order respectively, as the area S of lat 60°S, including all ice shelves, but not including the high seas within that area. These instruments made provision for the implementation of certain clauses of the Treaty; they followed the language of the Treaty and it was not intended to alter the definition of Antarctica that had long been accepted in British official publications (APC, 1982, p.3). For further information see British Antarctic Territory Gazetteer.

Antarctica (USA) 90° 00' 00.0" S 0° 00' 00.0" E
Name ID: 121850 Place ID: 421

The Antarctic continent, together with the islands rising from the continental block, centering roughly on the South Pole and lying almost wholly within the Antarctic Circle. It has an area of about 5.5 million square miles. Antarctica is a relatively high and compact mass and is snow covered except for some coastal areas and the protruding peaks of mountains and mountain ranges. The first sighting of Antarctica is contested but apparently occurred in the 1820's. The term Antarctic has been applied to the southern polar regions of Earth, and Antarctica to the continent, by analogy with the term Arctic, applied to the northern polar regions.

Antártica (CHL) 90° 00' 00.0" S 0° 00' 00.0" E
Name ID: 105111 Place ID: 421

Ellis Fjord (AUS) 68° 36' 10.8" S 78° 07' 55.2" E Fjord
Name ID: 421 Place ID: 4197

A narrow inlet about 33 km long, between Mule Peninsula and Broad Peninsula in the Vestfold Hills on the Ingrid Christensen Coast. Photographed by the Lars Christensen Expedition (1936-37), and plotted by Norwegian cartographers as a bay and a remnant lake which were called Mulvik (Snout Bay) and Langevatnet (The Long Lake) respectively. Analysis by Dr. John Roscoe of air photos taken by USN Operation Highjump (1946-47) showed these two features to be connected. The feature was renamed Ellis Fjord by Roscoe after Edwin E. Ellis, who served as aerial photographer on USN Operation Highjump in this area. First visited by an ANARE party led by Phillip Law on 31 January, 1955.

Showing all 4 place names.

The SCAR Composite Gazetteer is hosted by the Australian Antarctic Data Centre. The information in the footer below pertains to the AADC web site.