All scientific data collected by the Australian Antarctic program (AAp) are eventually described in the Catalogue of Australian Antarctic and Subantarctic Metadata (CAASM). CAASM can be used to search through AAp data descriptions, and it also provides links to access publicly available datasets, which can either be immediately downloaded or obtained from the Australian Antarctic Data Centre (AADC).

View the full metadata record
Citation
Riddle, M.J., Mcminn, A., Cunningham, L.K. (2003, updated 2019) Interseasonal variability of benthic diatoms communities within the Windmill Islands, Antarctica Australian Antarctic Data Centre - doi:10.4225/15/5ae8fd03767a0
Title
Interseasonal variability of benthic diatoms communities within the Windmill Islands, Antarctica
Data Centre
Australian Antarctic Data Centre, Australia
DOI
doi:10.4225/15/5ae8fd03767a0
Created Date
2003-06-11
Revision Date
2019-03-15
Parent record
ASAC_2201

Description

Sediment samples were collected with an Eckamn grab from four locations within the Windmill Islands (Herring Island, O'Connor Island, Shannon Bay and Brown Bay). A weekly sampling program was performed over a 10 week period, however not all locations could be accessed each time due to sea-ice conditions. All samples were collected at an 8 m water depth. Preliminary analysis of fortnightly samples are presented here. Diatom data are given as relative abundances of benthic diatom species. The abbreviations used to identify species are explained in the accompanying file sp_list.

This work was completed as part of ASAC project 1130 (ASAC_1130) and project 2201 (ASAC_2201).

Public summary from project 1130:

Algal mats grow on sea floor in most shallow marine environments. They are thought to contribute more than half of the total primary production in many of these areas, making them a critical food source for invertebrates and some fish. We will establish how important they are in Antarctic marine environments and determine the effects of local sewerage and tip site pollution. We will also investigate the impact on the algal mats of the additional UV radiation which results from the ozone hole.

Public summary from project 2201:

As a signatory to the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty Australia is committed to comprehensive protection of the Antarctic environment. This protocol requires that activities in the Antarctic shall be planned and conducted on the basis of information sufficient to make prior assessments of, and informed judgements about, their possible impacts on the Antarctic environment. Most of our activities in the Antarctic occur along the narrow fringe of ice-free rock adjacent to the sea and many of our activities have the potential to cause environmental harm to marine life. The Antarctic seas support the most complex and biologically diverse plant and animal communities of the region. However, very little is known about them and there is certainly not sufficient known to make informed judgements about possible environmental impacts.

The animals and plants of the sea-bed are widely accepted as being the most appropriate part of the marine ecosystem for indicating disturbance caused by local sources. Attached sea-bed organisms have a fixed spatial relationship with a given place so they must either endure conditions or die. Once lost from a site recolonisation takes some time, as a consequence the structure of sea-bed communities reflect not only present conditions but they can also integrate conditions in the past. In contrast, fish and planktonic organisms can move freely so their site of capture does not indicate a long residence time at that location. Because sea-bed communities are particularly diverse they contain species with widely differing life strategies, as a result different species can have very different levels of tolerance to stress; this leads to a range of subtle changes in community structure as a response to gradually increasing disturbance, rather than an all or nothing response.

This project will examine sea-bed communities near our stations to determine how seriously they are affected by human activities. This information will be used to set priorities for improving operational procedures to reduce the risk of further environmental damage.

The fields in this dataset are:

Species
Site
Abundance
Benthic
Date
Location

Show more...

Access

These data are publicly available for download from the provided URL.

Temporal Coverages

Spatial Coverages

Science Keywords

Additional Keywords

  • ANTARCTICA
  • BENTHIC
  • BENTHIC DIATOMS
  • ABUNDANCE
  • COMMUNITY COMPOSITION
  • DATE
  • LOCATION
  • SEASONAL VARIABILITY
  • MARINE BAYS
  • SITE
  • SPECIES

Locations

  • CONTINENT > ANTARCTICA > WINDMILL ISLANDS
  • GEOGRAPHIC REGION > POLAR

Platforms

  • FIELD SURVEYS

Instruments

  • GRAB SAMPLERS

Researchers

  • riddle, martin (INVESTIGATOR)
  • mcminn, andrew (INVESTIGATOR)
  • cunningham, laura (INVESTIGATOR,TECHNICAL CONTACT,DIF AUTHOR)

Use Constraints

This data set conforms to the PICCCBY Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

Please follow instructions listed in the citation reference provided at http://data.aad.gov.au/aadc/metadata/citation.cfm?entry_id=Diatoms_seasonal_var when using these data.

Creative Commons License